Maplewood Strives to Keep Loved Ones Illness Free

Influenza has been widespread throughout the state and has been known to be in the community as well.  At Maplewood of Sauk Prairie, we strive to keep loved ones free from illness by utilizing infection control practices and encouraging vaccinations for both residents and staff, including the influenza vaccination.   We realize your loved one is looking forward to your visit.  By applying these basic principles of infection prevention, it will make you a “good visitor”.

Tips provided by APIC:

Stay home.  Do not visit your loved one if you are sick or had any symptoms of illness within the last three days including: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, uncontrolled cough or rash.

Wash or sanitize hands frequently both before and after visiting your loved one.  Clean your hands after touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, after using the restroom and both before and after eating or drinking.  Use your sleeve to cover your cough or sneeze, do not sit on the resident’s bed or handle the equipment.  Help residents with hand hygiene before eating and after using the restroom.

Every one to two hours, disinfect high-touch surfaces such as door knobs, toilet handles, bedside trays, etc.

Wear surgical masks if requested by staff.  Remove the masks when leaving resident care areas. If you touch the mask, replace it.

Recognize if you’re coming down with an illness.  Be honest about how you feel and realize if you are coming down with a respiratory illness, you are MORE contagious during the first 24-48 hours than you are at the end of the illness – after your immune system has had a chance to fight the illness.

Gastrointestinal illness (stomach bugs) caused by viruses can spread like wildfire through long-term care communities.  Norovirus causes severe and prolonged nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Influenza (or “the flu”) can cause severe illness and sometimes death in long-term care residents.  The onset of symptoms is normally quick, including fever, chills, body aches, headaches, tiredness and runny/stuffy nose.  Everyone over the age of 6 months should receive the flu shot every year – recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Human Metapneumovirus and Adenovirus are the cause for everything from a cold to pneumonia.  They are spread when a person coughs or sneezes and has contact with others.  The Adenovirus can cause death in older adults and very young children.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe influenza-like illness in older adults and young children.  It is spread when someone coughs or sneezes and has contact with others.

Use common sense before visiting a loved one.

Source:  APIC, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.

 

Kidney Care

The month of March boasts National Kidney Month.  At Maplewood of Sauk Prairie, we’d like to share tips about kidneys and how to keep them healthy.

Many functions are performed by the kidneys including removing body waste, balancing the body’s chemicals and fluids, regulating blood pressure, producing red blood cells and helping bones to remain healthy.

Chronic Kidney Disease, CKD, is something that affects millions of Americans.  CKD is manageable, yet if undetected can worsen over time.

Anyone can be struck by CKD, yet factors such as diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes.  Symptoms are not always noticeable, but may include nausea, swelling in the feet, hands or face, back pain and unusual looking urine.  A simple test done on blood and urine can let you know if you have kidney disease.

Common kidney problems include kidney stones and kidney infections.  Though they are less serious, if left untreated, they can develop into a real problem.  An inherited disorder that can lead to kidney damage is polycystic kidney disease.

Key factors in preventing kidney problems include managing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.  There are also benefits to keeping kidneys healthy through reducing sodium in your diet, exercising regularly and controlling cholesterol.

Go to www.kidney.org for more information about kidney health.

 

Deciding where to retire is an important decision, that you need to weigh all your options. Do you want to retire where your relatives are close or where  the cost of living is less expensive. According to the website TopRetirements.com, these are the top 10 worst  states to retire in and why?

1) Illinois                       Poor fiscal health

2) California                  Expensive, and its finances are in disarray

3) NewYork                    very high taxes including property taxes

4) Rhode Island.            Worst-off state in the Northeast from a financial viewpoint; high

Taxes

5) New Jersey                 highest property taxes in the U.S.: Has pension funding issues

6) Ohio                             High unemployment and cold winters

7) Wisconsin                   high property taxes and frigid weather

8) Massachusetts            High cost of living and high property taxes

9) Connecticut                  Taxes Social Security and has high property taxes

10) Nevada                         foreclosure  capital of the world

Check out TopRetirement.com on these states or others that you may be thinking of retiring in. You can also check at the website Money-Rates.com to check the 10 best sretire for retirement.

The month of March boasts National Kidney Month.  At Maplewood of Sauk Prairie, we’d like to share tips about kidneys and how to keep them healthy.

Many functions are performed by the kidneys including removing body waste, balancing the body’s chemicals and fluids, regulating blood pressure, producing red blood cells and helping bones to remain healthy.

Chronic Kidney Disease, CKD, is something that affects millions of Americans.  CKD is manageable, yet if undetected can worsen over time.

Anyone can be struck by CKD, yet factors such as diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes.  Symptoms are not always noticeable, but may include nausea, swelling in the feet, hands or face, back pain and unusual looking urine.  A simple test done on blood and urine can let you know if you have kidney disease.

Common kidney problems include kidney stones and kidney infections.  Though they are less serious, if left untreated, they can develop into a real problem.  An inherited disorder that can lead to kidney damage is polycystic kidney disease.

Key factors in preventing kidney problems include managing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.  There are also benefits to keeping kidneys healthy through reducing sodium in your diet, exercising regularly and controlling cholesterol.

Go to www.kidney.org for more information about kidney health.

Stress Management

With the changes in government programs and the health care  system the need for more care  given by non-professional care givers will be a reality.  Even if you are a strong resilient person, the stress of being a caregiver can take a toll on your health and well-being.  Stress management techniques will be an important part of your daily routine.

Some of the signs of stress that you may not even notice because you are concerned about those you are caring for are:

  • tired all the time
  • overwhelmed and irritable
  • either sleeping too much or not enough
  • losing or gaining weight
  • loss of interest in activities

There are a variety of things that can help you deal with the stress of being a caregiver.  If someone is willing to help, accept the offer.  If they want to pick up some groceries, cook for you, stay with the person you are caring for or even take them for a walk, allow them to provide help.  It will be a wonderful way to give you a break.

As a caretaker, it is normal to feel guilty about many things.  Focus on those things you can control and remind yourself that you are doing the best you are capable of.  No one is perfect.  If you recognize a need for help, you will want to seek it out.  There are many organizations, associations and support groups to help with specific ailments.    These affiliations can offer encouragement and advice.

You will want to make time for yourself.   Get out and socialize with friends and family members.  It is important to maintain a strong support system to help manage the stress associated with being a caregiver.  It’s also important  to stay healthy.  Walking, getting enough sleep and eating a healthy diet are all things that promote good health.

Utilize respite care.  Respite care found at a nursing home, such as Maplewood of Sauk Prairie, has become a great option for both the one receiving care and the caretaker.  Though families take great joy in allowing their loved one to remain at home, the physical, emotional and financial strain for the caregiver can be overwhelming.  The family may choose to have their loved one stay at a nursing home where emergency access and professional assistance is provided for a few day or a few weeks.   It allows the caregiver to get a break, go on a much needed vacation or attend a function that would normally restrict them from attending.

Taking time for yourself actually makes you a better caregiver.  It’s hard for you to provide quality care for others if you are not caring for yourself.