Maplewood is like a good bottle of aged, fine wine. Only time and quality ingredients can create the complexities needed to become a superior product. At Maplewood, it’s about the care. You’ll receive emotional & physical care by certified, trained staff members in an ideal environment.
Maplewood’s memory care unit was built to create the best experience for a person with dementia. Too much stimulation heightens anxieties so there are a small number of residents in the memory care community and each resident has a private room and private bathroom. It is a cheery, safe place with an outdoor courtyard, where residents truly feel at home.
• Residents experience consistency and compassion. At Maplewood they are in contact with the same staff even at a time when other facilities are hiring temp agencies to fill openings.
• Trained staff – every employee at Maplewood has training on Alzheimer’s/Dementia twice a year. They know how to approach a person with memory decline, understand behaviors they exhibit, effectively act and react to residents and use successful wording.
• Every employee caring for your loved one is at the very least state certified as a CNA, Certified Nursing Assistant. This means your loved one will experience the best care methods. This includes proper hygiene, injury prevention, averting infections through excellent incontinence care and reducing complications such as aspiration, pneumonia or skin breakdown.
• Maplewood has nurses on staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This means a nurse will respond immediately to a concern. Some facilities have a nurse “on call”, which means a lag time for getting a response when there is a critical situation.

• Experienced employees regularly help on a personal and professional level by giving guidance and support. It is common for family members to consult with Maplewood staff about what to do for their loved ones.
• 3.5:1 ratio for resident to staff member.
• On-site speech, occupational and physical therapy with licensed therapist, 6 days a week.
• Use non pharmaceutical interventions such as diathermy & ultra sound to reduce both falls and pain management.
• Maplewood uses a multi-disciplinary approach. They look at nutrition, dehydration, overall medicine management and activities that encourage a positive distraction and will give residents purpose.
With dementia, memory loss is only the tip of the iceberg. A person can’t get back the memory that has been lost. At Maplewood we stimulate what remains. Individualized care plans are created by a nurse with coordinating activities that work around any skills which have been affected. For instance, music, dancing, rhythms and prayers are parts of memory that will always remain, so those activities are incorporated into daily activities.
To make an analogy many people can relate to, as a parent, you instinctually want your child to be cared for by the best person. You can utilize an inexperienced teenager or a very experienced adult and there will be a very different level of care. It is the same when looking for senior care. At Maplewood there is tremendous “value added” when care providers have specialized CNA training.

Maplewood Supports Nurses

Maplewood Supports Nurses

After the faux pas, Joy Behar, from The View, made about “nursing” being the talent Miss Colorado, Kelley Johnson, showcased during the Miss America pageant, nurses at Maplewood show support for nurse Johnson.
Back row: Stacy Sis, Raeann Marten, Jennifer Cone, Samantha Wilson, Melani Wheeler, Gloria Gesicki, Joni Blau
Front row: Bree Fourtner, Theresa Brunner, Niki Pearson (There are many other nurses that work at Maplewood. The above nurses were able to break away for a picture.)
As eonline.com printed: The View Co-Hosts Facing Backlash After Mocking Miss America Nurse Monologue: ”Why Does She Have a Doctor’s Stethoscope?”
Of course, Behar misspoke, as a stethoscope isn’t just for doctors—nurses wear them, too—a point that a number of nurses were more than happy to make.

It was the 4th of July. Chores were to a point where they could be left for a while and picking up sweet corn for supper was the perfect excuse to take a ride on the Goldwing. The deer that jumped out on their way home was the game changer to a wonderful afternoon for Randy and Diane Puttkamer.
As the motorcycle going 55 mph crashed, Randy strategically tried to cushion Diane’s fall by having her land on him. In the process, he sustained multiple fractures that required surgery. His lower right leg needed reassembly and his lung was deflated, plus both clavicles were broken, as were seven of his ribs. Diane experienced trauma to her arm. After 5 days at the UW Hospital, the Puttkamers came to Maplewood to receive extensive individualized rehabilitation and skilled care.
When Randy arrived at Maplewood he could not put weight on his right leg and needed help with all functions of mobility such as transfers and ambulation. Surgeons predicted that he would need skilled assistance for at least 4 months and in the end his gait would be affected. Randy was a well-motivated individual with a positive attitude who worked through intense pain. At Maplewood, Randy had the benefit of receiving therapy 5 days a week, 2 times a day for 3 hours. Besides exercises to improve range-of-motion, strengthening and conditioning as well as facilitate activities of daily living, he benefited from the use of other modalities found at Maplewood. Electrical stimulation and diathermy are two examples of specialized modalities used to manage pain. Reduced pain allowed him to be more mobile and build strength. He made a remarkable recovery and was able to go home two months earlier than anticipated. Randy does not need any assistive devices to walk other than a boot for healing purposes. His surgeons are flabbergasted at how far and fast progress has been made.
Diane also had rigorous therapy and has made great strides in her recovery. Fourteen years ago, she was in a car accident which left her with residual effects. Remarkably, through Maplewood’s rehabilitation, she is now able to use her arms in ways she had previously been unable to. Due to the injuries sustained to her right arm, she learned to use her left hard as she performs daily activities such as hanging laundry and cooking.
September 5, 2015 was a momentous day, as Diane and Randy were able to return home. They proudly tell others that Maplewood is not only for older people. It’s a place for younger people who want to get back to their life. “From housekeeping to the top administration, everyone cares and made us feel special. The facility is clean, staff is courteous and knowledgeable, therapy is individualized with the intention to get us back home, and the atmosphere is enjoyable. Maplewood made a tragic thing, very workable and though it is tough to say, an enjoyable experience. God not only was watching over us that day, but also gave us the skilled people from Maplewood to continue our journey.”

Improve your posture and you could improve your mood. Studies show sitting up with your spine straight and shoulders back can make you feel happier and more confident. Psychologists say this simple physical change lowers stress hormones and increases happiness hormones, which can cue the brain to switch to a more positive and poised state of mind.

Life is ironic. A brilliant man, who dedicated his life to improving the health of humans, was claimed by Alzheimers in the prime of his career.
Larry Whitesell grew up in Pennsylvania and attended Delaware College with a degree in animal husbandry. He married, Donna Keckler. Together, these opposites completed each other in a very complementary way. They had two daughters and now have two beautiful granddaughters. Larry Whitesell & Donna May 14 2015

In 1983, Larry uprooted his family and moved from Hershey Pennsylvania where he dedicated 15 years of his life doing cardiology research at the Hershey Medical Center in Pennsylvania. As a leader in his field, he was noticed by the University of Wisconsin’s head of cardiology and was offered a ground breaking position at UW Wisconsin where he started a program in Cardiology Research.

As Larry was blazing a trail utilizing gene therapy in cardiac research, he noticed some memory issues. In 2010, he retired early and was diagnosed with the early onset of Alzheimer’s. When Larry reached the stage where his family was unable to care for him, he came to Maplewood of Sauk Prairie to receive skilled care and physical therapy.

Maplewood has adopted the “Music in Memory” program where people with dementia and Alzheimer’s listen to favorite songs from the early adult years. This program has been known to provide joy and bring a person back to themselves while the music is being played. Those listening to music have experienced calming behaviors and may have the ability to respond in the present for a while after a listening session. Larry is one of the success stories associated with “Music in Memory”. As a result, he is experiencing more connections to his surrounding, making more eye and verbal contact.

Larry made a difference in many people’s life by doing cutting edge research. He has plans to continue contributing to society after he passes. He will be donating his brain for research in the hopes that scientists can pinpoint the gene that causes Alzheimer’s and a cure will be found.Larry Whitesell & Donna smiles 05-14-2015

Celebrate Earth Day
Since 1970, the world has celebrated April 22 as Earth Day, a time to bring environmental awareness and protection into the spotlight. Many communities honor the day with rallies or festivals where seniors set the stage. If you are looking to contribute, there are plenty of ways to get involved and leave the planet a little better than you found it.
Here are a few:
Take an intergenerational nature walk. Go for a nature walk with your grandchildren or other youngsters and share your favorite parts of nature. Bring along a trash bag and pick up any litter you see along the way.
Plant a legend. Arbor Day takes place this month, too. Honor both days by planting a tree with friends and family. This act will leave a legend of beauty for generations to come.
Paint the community green. Work with your neighbors and community managers to ensure that your home is operating a green as possible. Brainstorm together for ideas to reduce, reuse and recycle.
Lead a letter writing charge. Contact your local or state governments about ways to protect or improve the environment where you live. Encourage others to do the same.

Maplewood Sauk Prairie Offers Tips to Prolong A Senior’s Ability to Live at Home.

There are a variety of things to incorporate into a person’s daily living that increases safety and may prolong the ability for a senior to live in his/her home.
1. Bathroom Safety
• Utilize a shower seat.
• Have a cordless phone near a tub or shower, in case of an emergency.
• A walk-in shower or tub eliminates the need to step over a barrier which increases the risk of falling.
• Use a taller toilet seat. It makes it easier to get up or down.
• Install grab bars as an assistive aid and to help with stability.
2. Incorporate “Life Alert” or some monitoring agency. There may be a time when you can’t get to the phone because you fallen and by pushing a button on an assistive device the agency is notified that you need help.
3. Phone
• Multiple cordless phones around the house makes accessibility easier.
• Carry a cell phone on your person at all times.
• Use phones with large buttons for better visibility.
4. Rugs are tripping hazards
• Remove them or secure rugs in place with tape, tacks or non-skid backs.
5. Bright accessible lighting.
• Install automatic safety-motion lights for both the inside and outside of the home.
• Make sure the pathway to light switches is easily assessed.
6. Stairs
• Use non-skid strips for outside steps and porches.
• Make sure handrails or banisters are securely tightened for support.
• Remove runners on stairs. They are a tripping hazard.
• Indoor wooden stairs should have non-skid strips installed on them.
• Use and/or install a chair lift.
• Have a ramp for those who use a walker or wheelchair.
7. Outdoor
• Trim trees that cover walk ways.
• Install adequate lighting.
• Fix broken/cracked pavement or sidewalks
• Utilize non-skid materials on decks. It is a lot safer in wet weather.
• Fix broken or loose boards on decks.
• Secure hand and deck rails.
8. Bedroom
• Utilize bedrails to eliminate the possibility of falling out of bed.
• Have a phone next to the bed with emergency numbers programed or next to it.
• Proper bed height makes it easier to get into and out of bed.
• A firm mattress makes it easier to move on and off the bed.
• Have a light next to the bed.
• Utilize a night light.
9. Fire Safety
• Utilize smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. If possible, have the smoke detector hooked up so it is part of a monitoring alarm system that will automatically contact the fire department.
• Have fire extinguishers accessible. Place them in rooms that are high traffic areas such as bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchen and living room.

10. Power Outages
• A cell phone allows a person to communicate regardless if the power is out.
• Have a flashlight and batteries within easy reach.

ipodfamily
In 2012, a video clip of a man named Henry who has severe dementia went viral. It was spectacular because he was reawakened after listening to Cab Calloway – one of his favorite musical artists. The video came from a documentary called Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory, which is based upon the healing power of personalized music.
Music is linked to personal memories. Our brains are hard-wired to connect music with long-term memory. Simply hearing favorite songs from youth can bring back memories of a first love or specific life event.
People with severe dementia benefit from music’s ability to tap into an individual’s emotional recall. A person suffering from Alzheimer’s has trouble recalling names, places and facts, but can recall memories from their youth. Favorite music or songs can trigger memory and connect personal experiences to that song which provides therapeutic benefits such as calming chaotic brain activity and enabling the listener to focus on the present moment allowing them to regain a connection with others. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, yet regular users of a personalized music program will be more alert, engaged and conversant.
Maplewood has embraced the “Music and Memory” therapeutic program which has been known to bring life-changing benefits to those with cognitive and physical impairments. These benefits include:
• Individuals who display low communication skills begin to talk or become social.
• One who is depressed may feel happier.
• A person who has been less mobile may experience increased physical activity.
• Individuals are more cooperative, attentive and willing to accept care which enables more person-centered care.
• Because individuals are calmer and less agitated, sundowning (confusion and restlessness) is often reduced or eliminated.
• Those who listen to pleasurable music can reduce pain levels by more than 20%.
• Family and staff are able to connect in a more meaningful way with residents
Music and Memory is a personalized music program which utilizes iPods and is making a positive impact for a majority of residents living in care facilities. Maplewood Health and Rehabilitation Center – a 120 bed facility, located in Sauk City, WI, currently has 10 iPods to be used in this program and is looking for more so it can reach all its residents. Instead of filling the landfill with an old style iPod that was replaced with a smart phone or the latest and greatest model, consider donating your old iPod to Maplewood.
“Any unused iPods that are lying around your home will work. We are most interested in collecting any type of well-cared-for iPod and its charger. The iPods collected will be wiped clean of any music, restored to factory settings and put to good use at Maplewood. If you don’t have an iPod to donate and want to donate money, all funds collected will be used to purchase iPods and music from iTunes.”, explains Patty Spurgeon one of Maplewood’s certified Music and Memory technicians.
Call Patty for more information, 608.643.3383 or feel free to drop off your gently used iPods & chargers at Maplewood of Sauk Prairie, 245 Sycamore St., Sauk City, WI.

While you’re asleep, your brain is busy. Medical experts say even at rest, crucial cognitive functions are taking place, and neurons in the brain stay active. Amazingly, as you slumber, the brain performs several vital functions: it processes information, forms new memories, makes creative connections, cleans out toxins, and stores information about physical tasks.

Maplewood of Sauk Prairie Encourages You to Laugh out Loud
Is laughter really the best medicine? Many medical experts report that laughing produces significant health benefits.
Easy exercise: Think about what happens when you get the giggles: Your heart rate increases, you can’t catch your breath and your facial muscles are sore. That’s right – laughing is like a mild workout, burning up to 50 calories in just 10 minutes.
A happy heart: In addition to aerobic benefits, laughing heartily can improve circulation and help balance blood pressure levels, boosting cardiovascular health.
A stress-free smile: While some stress is good, too much can cause both mental and physical health problems. Laughter relieves stress by reducing stress hormones and releasing endorphins (feel-good chemicals) in the body. People usually feel more relaxed and happier after laughing, even during trying situations.
Rest and Relief: Laughter is considered a natural pain reliever, both by releasing endorphins and by serving as a temporary distraction from either physical or emotional pain. Watching a comedy before bedtime can ease painful symptoms and relax your muscles so sleep comes easier.
Fun Friendships: People love having someone to laugh with. Connect with friends by sharing a joke or two. The result is an active social life – a crucial component of good health and happiness.
“In this world, a good time to laugh is any time you can.” Linda Ellerbee
“All you need in the world is love and laughter. That’s all anybody needs. To have love in one hand and laughter in the other.” August Wilson
“Nothing shows a man’s character more than what he laughs at.” Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“There is little success where there is little laughter.” Andrew Carnegie
“You can’t deny laughter; when it comes, it plops down in your favorite chair and stays as long as it wants.” Stephen King
“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.” Mark Twain