After a liver transplant, the important process of rehabilitation happened at Maplewood of Sauk Prairie.

Testimonial:
Hello, my name is Howard. I’m from North Freedom. I’m here in Maplewood because I’m here after a liver transplant. I’m 48 and I believe that Maplewood is a good place, very good people, very good; they know what they are doing.

Now, I understand that Maplewood to a lot of people is assisted living, but this is also a really, very good rehabilitation center. I’m here due to, like I said, a liver transplant. When I arrived here, I couldn’t do anything for myself. Because I’m single and I live alone, going home after the transplant was not an option. I found Maplewood to be closest to home so that if I needed anything or my friends needed to see me, I was close enough for them to not have to travel hours, which is what I would’ve had to done if I was staying in UW Madison.

Here, the facility is very modern, people are very friendly. They’re very cooperative, and they’ll push you a little bit but not beyond what they believe you can accomplish. In a lot of cases, sometimes you just feel like you just can’t go any farther, they’ll show you, you can go farther and you’ll grow from the experience.

A special testimonial from Carol E., who chose Maplewood of Sauk Prairie for her rehabilitation is Sauk Prairie Wisconsin

 

 

Testimonial:

So when we fooled around for three years and the pain couldn’t handle anymore, my primary doctor finally got a special, what do you call it, contract so that I could go to a different hospital with my insurance that they would agree to pay for.

And Medicare. Okay. When she did that, I thought, well, maybe I could be selfish and ask if I could go to rehab at Maplewood because Mom was here a few years ago. They did a fine job with her. And I wanted it to be close for Roger so he didn’t have so far to drive, okay? It was everything I expected and more, besides. Not just staff, but the patients. I’ve made so many nice people…met them here, and had such a good time talking. It’s really eased my surgery.

And the cooperation here with me and how I’m feeling and concern for my wishes is unbelievable. I’ve never experienced it before anywhere else and it’s great. So basically, I was fortunate enough to be able to go home part of everyday for the last week and spend it with my husband. Then he’d bring me back. My curfew was 8:00. Been a lot of years since I’ve had a curfew but it was fine. And they’ve done a great job. Now, when this one’s healed completely and it’s onto the next one I’m definitely coming back here.

Maplewood Supports Nurses

Maplewood Supports Nurses

After the faux pas, Joy Behar, from The View, made about “nursing” being the talent Miss Colorado, Kelley Johnson, showcased during the Miss America pageant, nurses at Maplewood show support for nurse Johnson.
Back row: Stacy Sis, Raeann Marten, Jennifer Cone, Samantha Wilson, Melani Wheeler, Gloria Gesicki, Joni Blau
Front row: Bree Fourtner, Theresa Brunner, Niki Pearson (There are many other nurses that work at Maplewood. The above nurses were able to break away for a picture.)
As eonline.com printed: The View Co-Hosts Facing Backlash After Mocking Miss America Nurse Monologue: ”Why Does She Have a Doctor’s Stethoscope?”
Of course, Behar misspoke, as a stethoscope isn’t just for doctors—nurses wear them, too—a point that a number of nurses were more than happy to make.

It was the 4th of July. Chores were to a point where they could be left for a while and picking up sweet corn for supper was the perfect excuse to take a ride on the Goldwing. The deer that jumped out on their way home was the game changer to a wonderful afternoon for Randy and Diane Puttkamer.
As the motorcycle going 55 mph crashed, Randy strategically tried to cushion Diane’s fall by having her land on him. In the process, he sustained multiple fractures that required surgery. His lower right leg needed reassembly and his lung was deflated, plus both clavicles were broken, as were seven of his ribs. Diane experienced trauma to her arm. After 5 days at the UW Hospital, the Puttkamers came to Maplewood to receive extensive individualized rehabilitation and skilled care.
When Randy arrived at Maplewood he could not put weight on his right leg and needed help with all functions of mobility such as transfers and ambulation. Surgeons predicted that he would need skilled assistance for at least 4 months and in the end his gait would be affected. Randy was a well-motivated individual with a positive attitude who worked through intense pain. At Maplewood, Randy had the benefit of receiving therapy 5 days a week, 2 times a day for 3 hours. Besides exercises to improve range-of-motion, strengthening and conditioning as well as facilitate activities of daily living, he benefited from the use of other modalities found at Maplewood. Electrical stimulation and diathermy are two examples of specialized modalities used to manage pain. Reduced pain allowed him to be more mobile and build strength. He made a remarkable recovery and was able to go home two months earlier than anticipated. Randy does not need any assistive devices to walk other than a boot for healing purposes. His surgeons are flabbergasted at how far and fast progress has been made.
Diane also had rigorous therapy and has made great strides in her recovery. Fourteen years ago, she was in a car accident which left her with residual effects. Remarkably, through Maplewood’s rehabilitation, she is now able to use her arms in ways she had previously been unable to. Due to the injuries sustained to her right arm, she learned to use her left hard as she performs daily activities such as hanging laundry and cooking.
September 5, 2015 was a momentous day, as Diane and Randy were able to return home. They proudly tell others that Maplewood is not only for older people. It’s a place for younger people who want to get back to their life. “From housekeeping to the top administration, everyone cares and made us feel special. The facility is clean, staff is courteous and knowledgeable, therapy is individualized with the intention to get us back home, and the atmosphere is enjoyable. Maplewood made a tragic thing, very workable and though it is tough to say, an enjoyable experience. God not only was watching over us that day, but also gave us the skilled people from Maplewood to continue our journey.”

Here at Maplewood of Sauk Prairie, we want to provide exceptional care along with fantastic service for our residents.

Jo, from Baraboo Wisconsin, had a broken ankle and decided to work with a physical therapist in our rehabilitation department. She has continually improved and provided a video testimonial that you can watch.

Testimonial:
Hello, my name is Josephine Z, I am from Baraboo and I have just spent a month at Maplewood of Sauk Prairie in rehabilitation for a broken ankle, and I am now residing at Maplewood Village. I want to talk about the rehabilitation center. In June, on June 17th, I was trying to do some outside painting on a two-step stool and I took a tumble and broke my ankle in a couple of places. Something that I have never done before in my life. So my last thought for this summer was that I would be in a rehabilitation center, but I want to tell you about Maplewood, it’s an amazing place. The staff is fantastic. They are always there, they are always present. They are helpful, they are cheerful, they are fun. I came to love them very much for their hope for me. and ah, there is never anything that you want that they cannot try to do for you with–with great cheerful spirits.

I am now at Maplewood Village, hoping that I can, as soon as my ankle is ready for rehab, I will be able to travel by wheelchair, back over there for rehabilitation in their therapy department, which is also wonderful. The girls there and the men there are just super, and working with the patients and with the greatest cheer. I don’t know how they do it, they are– all of them when deal with people that are much more disabled and injured than I. I feel like an imposter with just a broken ankle, but it is a great place and I cannot say enough for it. The food is wonderful. The help is great. The surroundings are very pretty and very tastefully kept, and I would recommend it to anyone who needs that kind of service.

Neurological diseases continue to be studied, but for as much as we have learned about them, there is also much that we still don’t know.

Recently, however, researchers made a new finding that may not only change textbooks, but will change the way that we understand the link between the brain and the immune system.

Researchers from the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist.  These findings may lead to ground breaking new discoveries in neurological conditions, such as Alzheimers Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and many other neurological diseases.

Never known previously, the researchers have found a lymphatic system for the central nervous system (CNS).  As an example, it is know that Alzheimers Disease is caused by large chunks of proteins that build up in the brain.  This lymphatic system of the CNS may be inefficient in those patients who develop this disease and so more research needs to focus on this.

“Instead of asking, ‘How do we study the immune response of the brain?’ ‘Why do multiple sclerosis patients have the immune attacks?’ now we can approach this mechanistically. Because the brain is like every other tissue connected to the peripheral immune system through meningeal lymphatic vessels,” said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, professor in the UVA Department of Neuroscience and director of UVA’s Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG). “It changes entirely the way we perceive the neuro-immune interaction. We always perceived it before as something esoteric that can’t be studied. But now we can ask mechanistic questions.”

These finings will be published in the prestigious journal, “Nature”.

 

For more information:  NeuroscienceNews

Improve your posture and you could improve your mood. Studies show sitting up with your spine straight and shoulders back can make you feel happier and more confident. Psychologists say this simple physical change lowers stress hormones and increases happiness hormones, which can cue the brain to switch to a more positive and poised state of mind.

Life is ironic. A brilliant man, who dedicated his life to improving the health of humans, was claimed by Alzheimers in the prime of his career.
Larry Whitesell grew up in Pennsylvania and attended Delaware College with a degree in animal husbandry. He married, Donna Keckler. Together, these opposites completed each other in a very complementary way. They had two daughters and now have two beautiful granddaughters. Larry Whitesell & Donna May 14 2015

In 1983, Larry uprooted his family and moved from Hershey Pennsylvania where he dedicated 15 years of his life doing cardiology research at the Hershey Medical Center in Pennsylvania. As a leader in his field, he was noticed by the University of Wisconsin’s head of cardiology and was offered a ground breaking position at UW Wisconsin where he started a program in Cardiology Research.

As Larry was blazing a trail utilizing gene therapy in cardiac research, he noticed some memory issues. In 2010, he retired early and was diagnosed with the early onset of Alzheimer’s. When Larry reached the stage where his family was unable to care for him, he came to Maplewood of Sauk Prairie to receive skilled care and physical therapy.

Maplewood has adopted the “Music in Memory” program where people with dementia and Alzheimer’s listen to favorite songs from the early adult years. This program has been known to provide joy and bring a person back to themselves while the music is being played. Those listening to music have experienced calming behaviors and may have the ability to respond in the present for a while after a listening session. Larry is one of the success stories associated with “Music in Memory”. As a result, he is experiencing more connections to his surrounding, making more eye and verbal contact.

Larry made a difference in many people’s life by doing cutting edge research. He has plans to continue contributing to society after he passes. He will be donating his brain for research in the hopes that scientists can pinpoint the gene that causes Alzheimer’s and a cure will be found.Larry Whitesell & Donna smiles 05-14-2015